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Eleanor Roosevelt

Eleanor Roosevelt portrait 1933.jpg
Roosevelt in 1933

1st Chair of the Presidential Commission on the Status of Women

In officeJanuary 20, 1961 – November 7, 1962

President

John F. Kennedy

Preceded by

Position established

Succeeded by

Esther Peterson

1st United States Representative to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights

In office1947–1953

President

Harry S. Truman

Preceded by

Position established

Succeeded by

Mary Pillsbury Lord

1st Chair of the United Nations Commission on Human Rights

In office1946–1952

Preceded by

Position established

Succeeded by

Charles Malik

First Lady of the United States

In roleMarch 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945

President

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Preceded by

Lou Henry Hoover

Succeeded by

Bess Truman

First Lady of New York

In roleJanuary 1, 1929 – December 31, 1932

Governor

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Preceded by

Catherine Dunn

Succeeded by

Edith Altschul

Personal details

Born

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt
October 11, 1884 New York City, U.S.

Died

November 7, 1962 New York City, U.S.

Cause of death

Cardiac failure complicated by tuberculosis

Resting place

Home of FDR National Historic Site, Hyde Park, New York

Political party

Democratic

Spouse

Franklin D. Roosevelt ( m.  1905; died 1945)

Children

  • Anna Eleanor
  • James
  • Franklin
  • Elliott
  • Franklin Delano Jr.
  • John Aspinwall

Parents

  • Elliott Bulloch Roosevelt
  • Anna Rebecca Hall

Relatives

See Roosevelt family

Signature

Anna Eleanor Roosevelt was an American political figure, diplomat and activist. She served as the First Lady of the United States from March 4, 1933 to April 12, 1945 during her husband President Franklin D. Roosevelt's four terms in office, making her the longest serving First Lady of the United States. Roosevelt served as United States Delegate to the United Nations General Assembly from 1945 to 1952. President Harry S. Truman later called her the "First Lady of the World" in tribute to her human rights achievements.

Roosevelt was a member of the prominent American Roosevelt and Livingston families and a niece of President Theodore Roosevelt. She had an unhappy childhood, having suffered the deaths of both parents and one of her brothers at a young age. At 15, she attended Allenwood Academy in London and was deeply influenced by its headmistress Marie Souvestre. Returning to the U.S., she married her fifth cousin once removed, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, in 1905. The Roosevelts' marriage was complicated from the beginning by Franklin's controlling mother, Sara, and after Eleanor discovered her husband's affair with Lucy Mercer in 1918, she resolved to seek fulfillment in leading a public life of her own. She persuaded Franklin to stay in politics after he was stricken with a paralytic illness in 1921, which cost him the normal use of his legs, and began giving speeches and appearing at campaign events in his place. Following Franklin's election as Governor of New York in 1928, and throughout the remainder of Franklin's public career in government, Roosevelt regularly made public appearances on his behalf, and as First Lady, while her husband served as President, she significantly reshaped and redefined the role of First Lady.

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Discover Eleanor Roosevelt Quotes and Sayings

It is not fair to ask of others what you are not willing to do yourself. - Eleanor Roosevelt

It is not fair to ask of others what you are not willing to do yourself.

Eleanor Roosevelt

integrity fairness
The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams. - Eleanor Roosevelt

The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.

Eleanor Roosevelt

dreams future belief
Remember no one can make you feel inferior without your consent. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Remember no one can make you feel inferior without your consent.

Eleanor Roosevelt

self esteem
Old age has deformities enough of its own. It should never add to them the deformity of vice. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Old age has deformities enough of its own. It should never add to them the deformity of vice.

Eleanor Roosevelt

age
Probably the happiest period in life most frequently is in middle age, when the eager passions of youth are cooled, and the infirmities of age not yet begun as we see that the shadows, which are at morning and evening so large, almost entirely disappear at midday. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Probably the happiest period in life most frequently is in middle age, when the eager passions of youth are cooled, and the infirmities of age not yet begun as we see that the shadows, which are at morning and evening so large, almost entirely disappear at midday.

Eleanor Roosevelt

age life morning
Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Justice cannot be for one side alone, but must be for both.

Eleanor Roosevelt

alone
You have to accept whatever comes and the only important thing is that you meet it with courage and with the best that you have to give. - Eleanor Roosevelt

You have to accept whatever comes and the only important thing is that you meet it with courage and with the best that you have to give.

Eleanor Roosevelt

best courage
One's philosophy is not best expressed in words it is expressed in the choices one makes... and the choices we make are ultimately our responsibility. - Eleanor Roosevelt

One's philosophy is not best expressed in words it is expressed in the choices one makes... and the choices we make are ultimately our responsibility.

Eleanor Roosevelt

best
My experience has been that work is almost the best way to pull oneself out of the depths. - Eleanor Roosevelt

My experience has been that work is almost the best way to pull oneself out of the depths.

Eleanor Roosevelt

best experience work
I can not believe that war is the best solution. No one won the last war, and no one will win the next war. - Eleanor Roosevelt

I can not believe that war is the best solution. No one won the last war, and no one will win the next war.

Eleanor Roosevelt

best war
Perhaps nature is our best assurance of immortality. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Perhaps nature is our best assurance of immortality.

Eleanor Roosevelt

best nature
I think, at a child's birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift should be curiosity. - Eleanor Roosevelt

I think, at a child's birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift should be curiosity.

Eleanor Roosevelt

birthday
Campaign behavior for wives: Always be on time. Do as little talking as humanly possible. Lean back in the parade car so everybody can see the president. - Eleanor Roosevelt

Campaign behavior for wives: Always be on time. Do as little talking as humanly possible. Lean back in the parade car so everybody can see the president.

Eleanor Roosevelt

car time
You can't move so fast that you try to change the mores faster than people can accept it. That doesn't mean you do nothing, but it means that you do the things that need to be done according to priority. - Eleanor Roosevelt

You can't move so fast that you try to change the mores faster than people can accept it. That doesn't mean you do nothing, but it means that you do the things that need to be done according to priority.

Eleanor Roosevelt

change
You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, 'I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.' - Eleanor Roosevelt

You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, 'I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.'

Eleanor Roosevelt

courage experience fear strength
We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face... we must do that which we think we cannot. - Eleanor Roosevelt

We gain strength, and courage, and confidence by each experience in which we really stop to look fear in the face... we must do that which we think we cannot.

Eleanor Roosevelt

courage experience fear strength