About This Author

Jane Austen

Watercolour-and-pencil portrait of Jane Austen
Portrait, c.  1810

Born

16 December 1775 Steventon Rectory, Hampshire, England

Died

18 July 1817 Winchester, Hampshire, England

Resting place

Winchester Cathedral, Hampshire, England

Education

Reading Abbey Girls' School

Period

1787 to 1809–11

Relatives

  • James Austen
  • George Austen
  • Edward Austen Knight
  • Henry Thomas Austen
  • Cassandra Austen
  • Sir Francis Austen
  • Charles Austen
  • Eliza de Feuillide

Signature

Signature from Austen's 1817 will

Jane Austen was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism, humour, and social commentary, have long earned her acclaim among critics, scholars, and popular audiences alike.

With the publications of Sense and Sensibility , Pride and Prejudice , Mansfield Park and Emma , she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two additional novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, both published posthumously in 1818, and began another, eventually titled Sanditon, but died before its completion. She also left behind three volumes of juvenile writings in manuscript, a short epistolary novel Lady Susan, and another unfinished novel, The Watsons. Her six full-length novels have rarely been out of print, although they were published anonymously and brought her moderate success and little fame during her lifetime.

more from Wikipedia

Find On Amazon: Jane Austen

Discover Jane Austen Quotes and Sayings

Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter. - Jane Austen

Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter.

Jane Austen

alone
To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain for the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive. - Jane Austen

To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain for the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.

Jane Austen

beauty
A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of. - Jane Austen

A large income is the best recipe for happiness I ever heard of.

Jane Austen

best happiness
We do not look in our great cities for our best morality. - Jane Austen

We do not look in our great cities for our best morality.

Jane Austen

best great
One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best. - Jane Austen

One man's ways may be as good as another's, but we all like our own best.

Jane Austen

best
Business, you know, may bring you money, but friendship hardly ever does. - Jane Austen

Business, you know, may bring you money, but friendship hardly ever does.

Jane Austen

business friendship money
Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody. - Jane Austen

Give a girl an education and introduce her properly into the world, and ten to one but she has the means of settling well, without further expense to anybody.

Jane Austen

education
Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything. - Jane Austen

Men have had every advantage of us in telling their own story. Education has been theirs in so much higher a degree the pen has been in their hands. I will not allow books to prove anything.

Jane Austen

education
Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure. - Jane Austen

Selfishness must always be forgiven you know, because there is no hope of a cure.

Jane Austen

forgiveness hope
Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love. - Jane Austen

Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.

Jane Austen

friendship love
General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be. - Jane Austen

General benevolence, but not general friendship, made a man what he ought to be.

Jane Austen

friendship
The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid. - Jane Austen

The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid.

Jane Austen

good
My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation that is what I call good company. - Jane Austen

My idea of good company is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation that is what I call good company.

Jane Austen

good great
I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal. - Jane Austen

I do not want people to be very agreeable, as it saves me the trouble of liking them a great deal.

Jane Austen

great
Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance. - Jane Austen

Happiness in marriage is entirely a matter of chance.

Jane Austen

happiness marriage
There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort. - Jane Austen

There is nothing like staying at home for real comfort.

Jane Austen

home